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Author Topic: Becoming a US Citizen  (Read 6012 times)

Offline loaded

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2012, 04:28:31 pm »
Mexico: I'd prefer to keep my head attached thank you.
Canada:  I'm not fond of Canadian People.
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Offline Kim

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2012, 04:33:13 pm »
I went to Mexico one time on a cruise they can have it,

I would like to go to Canada someday though.

Offline loaded

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2012, 04:37:19 pm »
Alaska via Canada is the only way I'll go.
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Offline Kim

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2012, 04:38:45 pm »
Alaska via Canada is the only way I'll go.

Oh yeah Alaska would be great!!

Offline butters

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2012, 08:38:40 am »
Eastern Canada, ie French canadia, can fall off the earth and die! Bunch of rude Bastards over there. Been there done that, ruined me on canada
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Offline amarillobluesman13

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2012, 09:02:04 am »
Wouldnt expect French ppl to b so rude what with their women not shaving & all lol

Offline Snotrub

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2012, 09:30:08 am »
I have a few stamps in my passport but with the cost of flying plus the hassles of it all, we drive to vacation spots now. I have Mexico, Jamaica, Canada and California stamped in my book.
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Offline butters

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2012, 09:36:50 am »
Do border towns count as Mexico? Cause I've been close enough to spit on it.

Aw yes, the dumbies republic of Kawlifoorniia
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Offline Snotrub

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #33 on: February 18, 2012, 09:46:52 am »
Border towns, ugh!!  I've been in Nogales, Juarez, del rio, matamoros, Tijuana, and maybe one or two others. Matamoros was the nicest and the rest were all the same. Tijuana was the scariest.
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Offline butters

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2012, 09:55:52 am »
Border towns, ugh!!  I've been in Nogales, Juarez, del rio, matamoros, Tijuana, and maybe one or two others. Matamoros was the nicest and the rest were all the same. Tijuana was the scariest.

Yup,they're all the same, crap!
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Offline amarillobluesman13

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #35 on: February 18, 2012, 10:11:20 am »
Couldnt pay me enuff to go...im like one pf them Mexicans George Lopez talks about...lol

Offline chartreuse

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #36 on: February 18, 2012, 09:38:39 pm »
It's a bit complicated, I reckon, trying to generalise about countries. When you get down to cases, most of it is about the individuals in question, of course, but a whole lot is about the setting that y'all are in, too.

I'll try to give an example: Poland - three different settings.

1. I went to Poland once, had a great time. Everybody was friendly & helpful, on the surface, 'cos I was a guy visiting their country on business and then going home. But they were also a bit careful - 'cos I was a Westerner and there was still a lot of the old Cold War stuff in the air.

2. I met loads of Polish guys when we lived in England. Things would start out a bit tense, 'cos there was a lot of grumbling that "the Poles are comin' over here and takin' our jerbs". Truth was, there was plenty work to go around at the time and the only folks bitching were lazy bastards looking for an excuse for being unemployed. But things were still a bit awkward, until they figured out that despite my "English Redneck" accent, I wasn't we used to call a "Dole Wallah".

3. When I was in Dallas for my Citizenship test, the flight home got cancelled and I ended up in a hotel bar. I fell in drinking with some Poles. A couple had become citizens, the others were working towards it. This time, it didn't feel like we were foreigners to each other. We were all in the same boat - it didn't matter if we started in England or Poland, we'd all come to America and we'd all made a commitment to becoming Americans.

That, my friends, is what we used to call "the melting pot" and, IMHO, it's one of the things that made this country great.

It's a shame that it became politically incorrect. It's also confusing - all of the regular folks that I know still believe in it - so why did it go out of fashion?
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Offline txwildflower45

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Re: Becoming a US Citizen
« Reply #37 on: February 19, 2012, 12:10:48 pm »
It's a bit complicated, I reckon, trying to generalise about countries. When you get down to cases, most of it is about the individuals in question, of course, but a whole lot is about the setting that y'all are in, too.

I'll try to give an example: Poland - three different settings.

1. I went to Poland once, had a great time. Everybody was friendly & helpful, on the surface, 'cos I was a guy visiting their country on business and then going home. But they were also a bit careful - 'cos I was a Westerner and there was still a lot of the old Cold War stuff in the air.

2. I met loads of Polish guys when we lived in England. Things would start out a bit tense, 'cos there was a lot of grumbling that "the Poles are comin' over here and takin' our jerbs". Truth was, there was plenty work to go around at the time and the only folks bitching were lazy bastards looking for an excuse for being unemployed. But things were still a bit awkward, until they figured out that despite my "English Redneck" accent, I wasn't we used to call a "Dole Wallah".

3. When I was in Dallas for my Citizenship test, the flight home got cancelled and I ended up in a hotel bar. I fell in drinking with some Poles. A couple had become citizens, the others were working towards it. This time, it didn't feel like we were foreigners to each other. We were all in the same boat - it didn't matter if we started in England or Poland, we'd all come to America and we'd all made a commitment to becoming Americans.

That, my friends, is what we used to call "the melting pot" and, IMHO, it's one of the things that made this country great.

It's a shame that it became politically incorrect. It's also confusing - all of the regular folks that I know still believe in it - so why did it go out of fashion?

#3 is a very interesting perspective.  I am very proud to live in a country that others strive for.  The American dream is and always will be alive for those that are willing to go out their and get it or fight for it; which ever the case may call for.

I am very happy for you that you have achieved this goal. 
Another day in this carnival of souls
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